Olympians of Sobriety

Posted by on Jul 14, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Have you ever pondered, “What does it take to become an Olympic athlete”? I would say it takes years of learning and practice. An Olympic Athlete must be willing to spend years practicing to be the best in their sport. To be
 an Olympic Athlete requires
 commitment, a kind of promise or pledge to work toward a goal.

Olympic Athletes follow a schedule and plan for training time. Every day of the week, they go to practice. There is much sacrifice, or giving up what one likes to do. Olympic Athletes give up many activities. They keep up with schoolwork by studying before and after practice. Parents and families also sacrifice. Sometimes they drive their athletes many miles to practice before sunrise and late at night.

Before athletes can compete, or try out, in the Olympics, they compete in their state or country. When they lose, athletes work hard to overcome their disappointments. The most successful athletes are those who keep working toward their goal even when they lose.

Olympic Athletes must have strong minds as well as strong bodies. The best athletes believe they can win. They think positive thoughts which give them the energy, or the push, they need to win. Olympic Athletes concentrate on, or put all their attention or thought into their routines. They picture in their minds each action or step they will take in their routines. And they picture themselves winning! Athletes see their dreams come true when they receive the gold, silver, or bronze medal.

I bet this sounds familiar because…

“What does it take to become an Agent of Recovery”?  I would say it takes years of learning and practice. An Agent of Recovery must be willing to spend years committed to sobriety. An Agent of Recovery requires
 a commitment to themselves, family, friends and stakeholders. An Agent of Recovery follows a schedule, or plan, for training time such as attending meetings, service, and spending time with loved ones and personal investments.  Every day of the week, they go to practice. There is much sacrifice, or giving up what they once liked to do such as; using, partying, fighting and all night social inebriation. An Agent of Recovery must give up many activities; no longer lying, cheating, stealing or manipulating. They keep up with work and other activities by showing up and doing the best job they can do. Parents and families also sacrifice for an Agent of Recovery. Sometimes they call and ask hard questions like how the Agent is doing in recovery, they hold boundaries, push them to be independent and love the Agent despite their short comings.

Before an Agent of Recovery can compete in sobriety they compete in groups, therapy and in meetings. They compete with addiction and never let it get the upper hand. When they lose, an Agent of Recovery works hard to overcome their setbacks. The most successful Agents of Recovery are those who keep working toward their goal even when they relapse or when sobriety looses its purpose.

Agents of Recovery have strong minds as well as strong spirits. The best Agents of Recovery believe they can win. They think positive thoughts which give them the energy, or the push, they need to triumph. Agents of Recovery concentrate on, or put all their attention or thought into, their routines like substance refusal, avoiding unhealthy relationships, critical thinking and balanced lifestyles. They picture in their minds each action or step they will take in their routines. And they picture themselves winning!

So you see, Athletes you are already on your path to become Olympians of Sobriety. Take your steps now to be committed, have a schedule, sacrifice, compete, think positive, create energy, concentrate, and have a routine.

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